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Reading 1, Second Samuel 15:13-14, 30; 16:5-13
Psalm, Psalms 3:2-3, 4-5, 6-7
Gospel, Mark 5:1-20

Scripturally, the Song of Songs is unique in its celebration of sexual love. [6] It gives "the voices of two lovers, praising each other, yearning for each other, proffering invitations to enjoy". [7] The "daughters of Jerusalem " form a chorus to the lovers, functioning as an audience whose participation in the lovers' erotic encounters facilitates the participation of the reader. [8] Jewish tradition reads it as an allegory of the relationship between God and Israel . [9] Christian tradition, in addition to appreciating the literal meaning of a love song between man and woman, has read the poem as an allegory of Christ and his "bride" , the Christian Church . [10]

There is widespread consensus that, although the book has no plot, it does have what can be called a framework, as indicated by the links between its beginning and end. [11] Beyond this, however, there appears to be little agreement: attempts to find a chiastic structure have not been compelling, and attempts to analyse it into units have used differing methods and arrived at differing results. [12] The following schema from Kugler & al. [13] must therefore be taken as indicative rather than determinative:

The woman recalls a visit from her lover in the springtime. She uses imagery from a shepherd's life, and she says of her lover that "he pastures his flock among the lilies". [15]

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Reading 1, Second Samuel 15:13-14, 30; 16:5-13
Psalm, Psalms 3:2-3, 4-5, 6-7
Gospel, Mark 5:1-20

Scripturally, the Song of Songs is unique in its celebration of sexual love. [6] It gives "the voices of two lovers, praising each other, yearning for each other, proffering invitations to enjoy". [7] The "daughters of Jerusalem " form a chorus to the lovers, functioning as an audience whose participation in the lovers' erotic encounters facilitates the participation of the reader. [8] Jewish tradition reads it as an allegory of the relationship between God and Israel . [9] Christian tradition, in addition to appreciating the literal meaning of a love song between man and woman, has read the poem as an allegory of Christ and his "bride" , the Christian Church . [10]

There is widespread consensus that, although the book has no plot, it does have what can be called a framework, as indicated by the links between its beginning and end. [11] Beyond this, however, there appears to be little agreement: attempts to find a chiastic structure have not been compelling, and attempts to analyse it into units have used differing methods and arrived at differing results. [12] The following schema from Kugler & al. [13] must therefore be taken as indicative rather than determinative:

The woman recalls a visit from her lover in the springtime. She uses imagery from a shepherd's life, and she says of her lover that "he pastures his flock among the lilies". [15]

Christ was crucified on earth and the Church is crucified by all of us, by her members most particularly, because she is a church of sinn...

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.

Reading 1, Second Samuel 15:13-14, 30; 16:5-13
Psalm, Psalms 3:2-3, 4-5, 6-7
Gospel, Mark 5:1-20


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