Most of the pictures by Gloeden that were signed and numbered by him (or his assistants) with a typical blue pencil do not exceed number 3,100. Numbers exceeding 3,100 are therefore, normally, reprints
Higher numberings might have been added by distributors, both in Italy and abroad, and reflect the distributor's catalogue numbering, not Gloeden's.
Eventually, other numberings simply reflect catalogue numbers of recent reprints, not from negatives but from positives.

Most of the pictures by Gloeden that were signed and numbered by him (or his assistants) with a typical blue pencil do not exceed number 3,100. Numbers exceeding 3,100 are therefore, normally, reprints
Higher numberings might have been added by distributors, both in Italy and abroad, and reflect the distributor's catalogue numbering, not Gloeden's.
Eventually, other numberings simply reflect catalogue numbers of recent reprints, not from negatives but from positives.

This information is published from the Museum's collection database. Updates and additions stemming from research and imaging activities are ongoing, with new content added each week.  Help us improve our records by sharing your corrections or suggestions.

Most of the pictures by Gloeden that were signed and numbered by him (or his assistants) with a typical blue pencil do not exceed number 3,100. Numbers exceeding 3,100 are therefore, normally, reprints
Higher numberings might have been added by distributors, both in Italy and abroad, and reflect the distributor's catalogue numbering, not Gloeden's.
Eventually, other numberings simply reflect catalogue numbers of recent reprints, not from negatives but from positives.

This information is published from the Museum's collection database. Updates and additions stemming from research and imaging activities are ongoing, with new content added each week.  Help us improve our records by sharing your corrections or suggestions.

Baron Wilhelm von Gloeden (September 16, 1856 – February 16, 1931) was a German photographer who worked mainly in Italy. He is mostly known for his pastoral nude studies of Sicilian boys, which usually featured props such as wreaths or amphoras suggesting a setting in the Greece or Italy of antiquity. From a modern standpoint, his work is commendable due to his controlled use of lighting as well as the often elegant poses of his models. His innovations include the use of photographic filters and special body makeup (a mixture of milk, olive oil, and glycerin) to disguise skin blemishes.

Wilhelm von Gloeden's background is something of a mystery. Although Gloeden alleged he was a minor German aristocrat from Mecklenburg, the heirs of the baronial branch of the Gloeden family have always insisted that no such person existed in their family records and that his claim to a barony was without warrant; the barony became extinct in 1885 with the death of Baron Falko von Gloeden. [ citation needed ]

It is believed he was the son of head forester Carl Hermann Gloeden (1820–1862) and his wife Charlotte Maassen (1824–1901; from 1864 Charlotte von Hammerstein). [ citation needed ]


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