Uploaded by associate-angela-dugas on April 8, 2014

Everyone — democrats, fascists, feminists, antifeminists, Christians, atheists, analytic philosophers, anti-analytic deconstructionist philosophers — has found Nietzsche’s work to contain precisely their message. 

For some he is an authoritarian antidemocrat who believes that only the wellbeing of the “superman,” that exceptional individual such as Goethe, Shakespeare or Socrates, is of any value. Many who read him this way find it unsurprising that (notwithstanding his vociferous anti­-anti-Semitism) the Nazis adopted him as their intellectual forerunner. For other readers, however, he is the father of “postmodernism” who discovered that “there are no truths, only interpretations” (except, perhaps, this truth), a believer in playfulness, dance, and individual “free-spiritedness.”

“Human, All-too-Human” was written in close collaboration with Nietzsche's then best friend, Paul Rée, with whom he developed the practice of “psychological observation” based on the idea that human beings habitually deceive themselves as to the true motives of their actions, and that their real motives typically fall far short of what their morality says they should be. One prefers, Nietzsche observes, to save a drowning man when there is someone on hand to applaud the action. People give money to beggars because they enjoy displaying their superior status and power — the first glimmering of the 'will to power' thesis.

From: Seminar: A Journal of Germanic Studies
Volume 43, Number 1, February 2007
pp. 81-83 | 10.1353/smr.2007.0010

If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'.


Friedrich Nietzsche, der erste tragische Philosoph. Eine Entdeckung by Reto Winteler (review)

Uploaded by associate-angela-dugas on April 8, 2014

Uploaded by associate-angela-dugas on April 8, 2014

Everyone — democrats, fascists, feminists, antifeminists, Christians, atheists, analytic philosophers, anti-analytic deconstructionist philosophers — has found Nietzsche’s work to contain precisely their message. 

For some he is an authoritarian antidemocrat who believes that only the wellbeing of the “superman,” that exceptional individual such as Goethe, Shakespeare or Socrates, is of any value. Many who read him this way find it unsurprising that (notwithstanding his vociferous anti­-anti-Semitism) the Nazis adopted him as their intellectual forerunner. For other readers, however, he is the father of “postmodernism” who discovered that “there are no truths, only interpretations” (except, perhaps, this truth), a believer in playfulness, dance, and individual “free-spiritedness.”

“Human, All-too-Human” was written in close collaboration with Nietzsche's then best friend, Paul Rée, with whom he developed the practice of “psychological observation” based on the idea that human beings habitually deceive themselves as to the true motives of their actions, and that their real motives typically fall far short of what their morality says they should be. One prefers, Nietzsche observes, to save a drowning man when there is someone on hand to applaud the action. People give money to beggars because they enjoy displaying their superior status and power — the first glimmering of the 'will to power' thesis.


bookmarkden.info
51jvYCnrRgL